Pet Care Blog

Why should my pet have a fecal exam?

The best way to ensure that your pet, and your family, are safe from intestinal parasites is by getting annual pet fecal exams done at your vet's office. Yearly fecals give your vet an opportunity to check for intestinal parasites before more serious conditions arise. Here, our Southeast Memphis vets explain more.


What is a fecal exam?

A fecal is a microscopic exam of your pet's feces, which is performed at your veterinarian's office. Annual fecal's will help your vet to identify and treat any infections that could be compromising your pet's health and even the health of household.

What do fecals detect?

Your vet will be on the lookout for parasites such as roundworms and hookworms when doing fecal exams. These parasites can make pets uncomfortable, irritable, and could lead to more serious issues. A number of parasites can even be transmitted to people.

Intestinal parasites live inside of your pet’s gastrointestinal tract, keeping them hidden from view. That's why fecals are the best way to detect their presence.

How do I prepare for my pet's fecal?

Collect a fresh stool sample and bring it to your vet's office on the same day, ideally within 4 to 6 hours, for the most accurate results.

It's important not to allow the stool sample to dry out or dehydrate since many of the potential parasites will be killed, which in turn could mask their presence.

How often does my pet need a fecal?

Pets should be tested for intestinal parasites at least once a year, but puppies and animals with gastrointestinal issues might need more frequent fecal exams. Ask your vet how often you should bring in your pet’s stool sample for a fecal.

Fecal exams are included in our annual Wellness Plans. Choose the Wellness Plan that's right for your pet.

Looking for a vet in Southeast Memphis?

We're always accepting new patients, so contact our veterinary hospital today to book your pet's first appointment.

Contact Us

Related Articles View All

Pneumonia in Dogs - Symptoms to Watch For

Although it's not be a condition that most pet parents think about, dogs like people can develop pneumonia. Pneumonia in dogs can be a serious health concern, however treatment is available and most dogs recover well. Here our Southeast Memphis vets share some of the symptoms of pneumonia in dogs, and how this condition is treated.

Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy - TPLO Surgery for Dogs

A dog's cranial cruciate ligament (often referred to the dog's ACL) works much the same as a human's ACL and helps the dog's knee functioning correctly. If your dog has a torn ACL, your Memphis vet may recommend TPLO surgery to repair the issue.

Knee Surgery for Dogs with Torn Cruciate

If your pooch is suffering from a torn cranial cruciate ligament (CCL/ACL) your Southeast Memphis vet may recommend surgery to repair the damaged knee and get your dog up and running again. Here are 3 common surgeries for treating this knee injury in dogs.

Diabetes In Dogs

Cases of diabetes in dogs are on the rise. Today our Memphis vets share some of the most common signs of this disease in dogs, and what you should do if your dog is displaying symptoms of diabetes.

ACL Surgery for Dogs - Cruciate Surgery

The dog's cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) is frequently referred to as the dog's ACL or 'cruciate'. This connective tissue joins the upper and lower leg bones at the dog's knee and may become injured. Today, our Memphis vets explain the three main ACL surgeries for dogs.